Nothing Daunted: The Unexpected Education of Two Society Girls in the West - Dorothy Wickenden

I have yet to figure out how Dorothy Wickenden, managing editor of The New Yorker, found time to delve so deeply into her grandmother’s trove of letters from the early part of the 20th century and piece together the entertaining and enlightening Nothing Daunted (Scribner, $26). From letters and interviews, Wickenden recounts how, after graduating from college, two upscale young women from Auburn, New York (one of them Dorothy’s grandmother) ignored the conventions of the day (to marry and have children) and became teachers in what was still the American frontier. The book traces their experiences of life in a homestead community on the western slope of the Rockies. Artfully written, Nothing Daunted is a story of adventure, independence, geography, romance, and social adaptability. A great read!

Nothing Daunted: The Unexpected Education of Two Society Girls in the West By Dorothy Wickenden Cover Image
$26.00
ISBN: 9781439176580
Availability: Special Order—Subject to Availability
Published: Scribner - June 21st, 2011

Nothing Daunted: The Unexpected Education of Two Society Girls in the West By Dorothy Wickenden Cover Image
$18.99
ISBN: 9781439176597
Availability: Not On Our Shelves—Ships in 1-5 Days
Published: Scribner - April 24th, 2012

Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President - Candice Millard

With the right narrator, a seemingly one-dimensional historical event can become a riveting story. This is the case with Candice Millard and The Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine, and the Murder of a President (Doubleday, $28.95). Millard, who spun a tale of adventure and suspense out of Teddy Roosevelt’s 1912 expedition through the Amazon in The River of Doubt, is such a skillful writer, and her story is so fascinating, that you barely notice how the vivid details presented early on gradually draw together into a powerful whole. James Garfield’s life and death is a saga of political wrangling, a delusional assassin, and medical techniques that failed to save the President and might in fact have killed him—techniques that included Alexander Graham Bell’s effort to develop an electrical device to locate the bullet in the fallen president’s back.

Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President By Candice Millard Cover Image
$18.00
ISBN: 9780767929714
Availability: In Stock—Click for Locations
Published: Vintage - June 12th, 2012

The Mirage Man: Bruce Ivins, the Anthrax Attacks, and America's Rush to War - David Willman

David Willman’s The Mirage Man (Random House, $27) has not gotten the attention it deserves, perhaps because some of those in Willman’s cross-hairs are his fellow journalists. But this is an important piece of investigate reporting by a Pulitzer Prize- winning (and old-school) investigative reporter for The Los Angeles Times. In exploring the bizarre events and investigation surrounding the anthrax attacks after 9/11, Willman’s reporting shows how and why the people and institutions—from politicians to the news media to the FBI—entrusted with the protection of the public, failed in their duties. In the hands of such a skilled reporter, the story becomes a cautionary tale as much as an exposé. We learn from The Mirage Man what happens when emotion, hysteria, and collective psychology infuse judgment and decision-making. And we are reminded that it is not simply institutions, or laws, or regulations that must work to protect the public. It is rational, dispassionate thinking on the part of human beings—and reliance on good old- fashioned evidence—that are desperately required.

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